A Delicate Balance

It’s a delicate balance, this living with lung cancer; between life and death, between treatment and quality of life, between disease and health.

It’s been said that we begin dying as we take our first breath, and we don’t know the hour or manner of our death. There is currently no cure for lung cancer. The best I can hope for is some time with NED (No Evidence of Disease), or at least no progression in the growth of the tumors in my lungs, lymph nodes, and liver, and no further metastasis. This disease may kill me, or not. I could die from something totally unrelated to lung cancer – getting hit by a meteor for example – or I could die from complications from the disease or from the treatment itself. Life is what we make it, and death comes to us all.

Quality of life will be different for each person. For me, it means having more good days than bad. It is having fewer days suffering the side effects than not. My new regimen has given me two bad days so far. Today is not bad at all, and the first day after treatment was good, so I’m batting better than .500 at the moment. And I won’t have another treatment for 2 1/2 weeks. So it’s looking good. Each person has to decide for herself what quality of life is acceptable and for how long. If I reach the point that I have more bad days than good, then my quality of life is suffering, and it will be time to reassess treatment vs. hospice care. But until that day comes, I intend to live my life as fully as I can.

Health is something I always took for granted, in spite of my bad habits in my younger days. I think we all feel invulnerable when we are young. We don’t think about unsafe behaviors, about dying, about chronic illness, about aging. We think we will live forever, even though in some part of our brain we know we won’t. Disease is an uncomfortable fact of life for many of us as we age. We are living longer these days, so more of us are suffering illnesses like diabetes, and high blood pressure, and heart disease, and various cancers. The pressures we live under for most of our lives has an effect on our health unless we learn to decompress at an early age. I didn’t know I was under so much pressure until I started seriously looking at my life and what I wanted it to be (somewhere back in my 40s – better late than never!).

So once again onward and upward. I will try to keep this delicate balance for as long as I can.

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